magictransistor:

Prof. Dr. Max Bruckner; Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900).

Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.

(Source: rudygodinez, via highgatedreams)

— 1 week ago with 7200 notes

weepling:

сonor walton

water and milk
oil on linen

to show thinness in wide strokes

(Source: olgainoue, via maritblog)

— 2 weeks ago with 3830 notes

I love how behind every single window, there is a different person who has a story that we know nothing about and I sometimes forget that my life isn’t the only life in the world

I love how behind every single window, there is a different person who has a story that we know nothing about and I sometimes forget that my life isn’t the only life in the world

(Source: eraessera, via xgrayvision)

— 2 weeks ago with 352485 notes
atrocia:

Paper replica of the entrance to the Crystal Palace from the 1851 Worlds Fair 

atrocia:

Paper replica of the entrance to the Crystal Palace from the 1851 Worlds Fair 

(via scalemodel)

— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

Via

While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.

“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.

He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.

 

— 2 weeks ago with 1791 notes

acehotel:

Pasadena, CA

John Whitney — Matrix III, 1972.

When American John Whitney founded Motion Graphics Incorporated in 1960, he’d already spent two decades working as a mechanical animator and inventor — a career that won him a Guggenheim Fellowship, and saw him working on such seminal visual effects as Saul Bass’ glorious title sequence for Hitchcock’s Vertigo. Using a converted WWII antiaircraft gun director, Whitney built his own 12-foot analogue computer in the 1950s, becoming in the process one of the primitive forebears of computer animation.

Whitney graduated to digital processes by the ’70s, when he created this gorgeously hypnotic film in collaboration with Terry Riley.

— 2 weeks ago with 18 notes

wetheurban:

ART: Everything Illuminates by Jiang Pengyi

Chinese artist Jiang Pengyi mixes liquid wax and fluorescent powder onto objects to create surreal art you can’t get out of your mind.

Read More

— 3 weeks ago with 3427 notes

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

Via

While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.

“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.

He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.

 

— 1 month ago with 1791 notes
uniformla:

MIT Design Class, 1964

uniformla:

MIT Design Class, 1964

(via laukitsch)

— 1 month ago with 33 notes